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Sunday, July 26, 2020 | History

2 edition of Water-level changes in the High Plains aquifer--predevelopment to 1992 found in the catalog.

Water-level changes in the High Plains aquifer--predevelopment to 1992

Dugan, Jack T.

Water-level changes in the High Plains aquifer--predevelopment to 1992

by Dugan, Jack T.

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  • 2 Currently reading

Published by U.S. Dept. of the Interior, U.S. Geological Survey, U.S. Geological Survey, Earth Science Information Center, Open-File Reports Section, [distributor] in Lincoln, Neb, Denver, Colo .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Aquifers -- High Plains (U.S.),
  • Groundwater -- High Plains (U.S.),
  • High Plains Aquifer.

  • Edition Notes

    Other titlesWater level changes in the High Plains aquifer--predevelopment to 1992
    Statementby Jack T. Dugan, Timothy McGrath and Ronald B. Zelt.
    SeriesWater-resources investigations report -- 94-4027
    ContributionsMcGrath, T. J., Zelt, Ronald B., Geological Survey (U.S.)
    The Physical Object
    Paginationvi, 56 p. :
    Number of Pages56
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17111371M

      McGuire V L Water level changes in the high plains Aquifer, Predevelopment to –06, and – Scientific Investigations Report – Google Scholar Medellin-Azuara J, MacEwan D, Howitt R E, Koruakos G, Drogul E, Brush C, Kadir T, Harter T and Lund J R Hydro-economic analysis of groundwater pumping for California Cited by: 4. The Ogallala, or High Plains, Aquifer is a porous body of complex sediments and sedimentary rock formations that conducts groundwater and yields significant quantities of water to wells and springs. The principal sediments and rocks of the aquifer range in age from 33 million years old to sediments being deposited today, but the majority is.

    Water-level changes in the High Plains aquifer: Predevelopment to Water Resources Investigation Report 91– Water Resources Investigation Report 91– Lincoln: U.S. Geological by: 3. Water-Level Changes in the High Plains Aquifer, Predevelopment to , to , and to USGS: Science Topics: groundwater USGS: Science Topics: surface-water level.

    The High Plains aquifer is the primary source of water for the production of food and fiber in the Great Plains area, central United States, and drives much of the economy of this region. However, the saturated thickness of the central and southern portions of the aquifer has diminished since the early s because of an imbalance between Cited by: 3. Water-Level Changes in the High Plains Aquifer, Predevelopment to , , and , and Change in Water in Storage, Predevelopment to Law, College of Nebraska Law: Mission Statement and Strategic Plan.


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Water-level changes in the High Plains aquifer--predevelopment to 1992 by Dugan, Jack T. Download PDF EPUB FB2

Water-Level Changes in the High Plains Aquifer- Predevelopment to By Jack T. Dugan, Timothy McGrath, and Ronald B. Zelt ABSTRACT Regional variability in water-level change in the High Plains aquifer underlying parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming results from large regionalCited by: The estimated average area-weighted water-level change, from to waseven though precipitation was well-above normal in in the High Plains.

Water- level declines of 3 to 5 feet were widespread in the intensively irrigated areas of southwestern Kansas and the northern part of the Southern High Plains of Texas.

changes. The data base of water-level measurements has been expanded considerably in selected areas to add greater definition to water-level changes. Additional data-base management procedures have been instituted to minimize inconsistencies in comparable data.

i 2 WATER-LEVEL CHANGES IN THE HIGH PLAINS AQUIFER-PREDEVELOPMENT TO Cited by: 7. Get this from a library. Water-level changes in the High Plains aquifer, predevelopment to [Jack T Dugan; T J McGrath; Ronald B Zelt; Geological Survey (U.S.)]. Get this from a library. Water-level changes in the High Plains aquifer--predevelopment to [Jack T Dugan; Donald E Schild; Geological Survey (U.S.)].

The water-level rises in parts of the eastern High Plains of Nebraska and the extreme southern High Plains of Texas are closely associated with well above normal precipitation in these areas since (Click on image for a larger version, 50 Kbytes). Figure 1.

Water-level change in. Water-level change in the High Plains aquifer underlying parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming results from differences in recharge from precipitation and ground-water withdrawals for irrigation.

From the beginning of irrigation development () towater levels declined in several areas, and exceeded feet in parts of the Central. Water-Level Changes in the High Plains Aquifer--Predevelopment to By Jack T.

Dugan and Donald E. Schild. U.S. Geological Survey Water-Resources Investigations Report Lincoln, Nebraska Abstract. Changes in water levels in the High Plains aquifer underlying parts of South Dakota, Wyoming, Nebraska, Colorado, Kansas, New Mexico. High Plains Aquifer Water-Level Monitoring Study Water-Level Changes in the High Plains Aquifer—Predevelopment to By Timothy McGrath and Jack T.

Dugan. U.S. Geological Survey Water-Resources Investigations Report Lincoln, Nebraska Abstract. Detailed Description. High Plains aquifer water-level changes, predevelopment (about ) to Figure 1 from USGS SIR Details.

Image Dimensions: x You searched for: All Fields (("high plains" OR ) AND (aquifer OR watershed OR hydro OR model OR gage OR csrees OR compet) NOT (texas OR southern OR northern)) Remove constraint All Fields: (("high plains" OR ) AND (aquifer OR watershed OR hydro OR model OR gage OR csrees OR compet) NOT (texas OR southern OR northern)) Format Book OR Microfilm OR Map.

Water Level Declines in the High Plains Aquifer: Predevelopment to Resource Senescence by Erin M. Haacker1, Anthony D. Kendall 2, and David W. Hyndman Abstract A large imbalance between recharge and water withdrawal has caused vital regions of the High Plains Aquifer (HPA) to experience significant declines in Size: 3MB.

The High Plains aquifer underlies million acres (, square miles) in parts of eight States—Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming.

Water-level declines began in parts of the High Plains aquifer soon after the beginning of substantial irrigation with groundwater in the aquifer area. This report presents water-level changes in the High Cited by: Water Level Declines in the High Plains Aquifer: Predevelopment to Resource Senescence.

linear fit to water level maps from to water-level changes in the High Plains aquifer. Water-Level Changes in the High Plains Aquifer - Predevelopment to (WRIR). 55 pp., size " x 11". Description: Sections wiht illustrations showing estimated average potential recharge and consumptive irrigation requirements have been added to the discussion and factors affecting water-level changes in the High Plains.

(A3) Supplemental water-level change data used to substantiate the map of water-level changes in the High Plains aquifer, predevelopment (about ) to (B1) Spatial data set of mapped water-level changes in the High Plains aquifer, to (B2) Water-level change data used to map water-level changes in the High Plains aquifer, This raster dataset is shown in figure 1 in the report (SIRMcGuire, ) titled "Water-Level Changes and Change in Water in Storage in the High Plains Aquifer, Predevelopment to and " U.S.

Geological Survey Ask USGS - Water Webserver Team mailing National Center. The High Plains aquifer extends from south of about 32 degrees to almost 44 degrees north latitude and from about 96 degrees 30 minutes to degrees west longitude.

The aquifer underlies aboutsquare miles in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming. This digital data set is the water-level measurements from 7, wells measured in.

The U.S. Geological Survey has released a new report detailing changes of groundwater levels in the High Plains Aquifer. The report presents water-level change data in the aquifer in two separate periods: from –the time prior to significant groundwater irrigation development–toand to This report presents water-level changes in the High Plains aquifer from the time before substantial groundwater irrigation development had occurred (about and termed “predevelopment” in.

McGrath, T. J. (Timothy J.): PIPECAR, version a microcomputer program for the structural analysis and design of circular and horizontal elliptical reinforced concrete pipe culverts: .McGuire, V. L.,Water-level changes in the High Plains aquifer, predevelopment to, andand Change in Water in Storage, Predevelopment to U.S.

Geological Survey, Scientific Investigation Report13 p.The Ogallala Aquifer (oh-guh-LAH-luh) is a shallow water table aquifer surrounded by sand, silt, clay, and gravel located beneath the Great Plains in the United States. One of the world's largest aquifers, it underlies an area of approximatelysq mi (, km 2) in portions of eight states (South Dakota, Nebraska, Wyoming, Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma, New Mexico, and Texas).